Trauma, Eating Disorders, and Impact on Brain Functioning

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Please join us for a wonderful presentation from Dr. Ed Hamlin, PhD, BCN on Friday, March 29 from 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM. Doors open at 10:00 AM and the presentation will begin at 10:15 AM. Light breakfast will be served. 

Title: Trauma, Eating Disorders, and Impact on Brain Functioning
Eating disorders are generally more about underlying issues than they are about food or eating. Previous research has shown a strong relationship between trauma, particularly interpersonal trauma, and eating disorders. The mechanisms of the relationship between past trauma and eating disorders is not well understood but appears likely to involve alterations in neurobiological functioning which negatively impact both emotion regulation capacities and control over attention processes. Successful treatment of eating disorders often requires adequately addressing underlying comorbid conditions. Dr. Hamlin has spent the last decade examining the neurophysiology of early trauma and more recently of eating disorders using the non-invasive assessment approach of quantitative EEG (qEEG).
In this workshop, the similarities and differences between the two conditions will be explored. Previous research will be reviewed including Dr. Hamlin’s qEEG findings in both early trauma and eating disorders. Also, the preliminary findings from an on-going research project at Avalon Hills Eating Disorder Treatment Center for assessing neurophysiological functioning and designing effective approaches for addressing the factors underlying eating disorders.

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Learning objectives:
At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1) Discuss the research showing connections between past trauma and eating disorders.
2) Understand the role of quantitative EEG in assessing neurophysiology.
3) List the key factors that need to be addressed in treating eating disorders and problems associated with past trauma.

Presenter Details:
Dr. Ed Hamlin, PhD, BCN is a neuropsychologist and the Clinical Director of the Institute for Applied Neuroscience. He currently holds (adjunct) faculty positions as Professor at Western Carolina University and associate professor in the Department of Psychiatrist at the University of North Carolina Medical Center. In addition to clinical work, he conducts research and presents workshops regarding applied neuroscience and brain/mind relationships. His reseach projects involve examining the impact of early abuse and neglect on the developing brain and how to correct maladaptive patterns as well as a major collaborative research study examining dysfunctional brain patterns in patients with eating disorders. 

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CE Event Details: 1.75 CE Credits Available